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State Tournaments:     Girls' Hockey:  Brackets  |  Results  |  Ticket Information Girls' Gymnastics:  Feb 24-25, U of MN - Sports Pavilion   Team Results: Class A Class AA
Girls' Hockey - Class AA Semifinal  
#1 Edina H.S.    4
#4 Eden Prairie H.S.    0
Game Summary
Girls' Hockey - Class AA Semifinal  
#2 Blaine H.S.    5
#3 Hill-Murray School    1
Game Summary
Girls' Hockey - Class A Semifinal  
#1 Blake School (The)    4
#5 Northfield H.S.    1
Game Summary
Girls' Hockey - Class AA Consolation  
Farmington H.S.    1
Forest Lake H.S.    0
Game Summary
State Girls' Hockey Tournament
Home Page Photo The 22nd annual Minnesota State High School League girls' hockey state tournament is scheduled for Feb. 22-25 at the Xcel Energy Center in downtown St. Paul with the consolation rounds being played at Ridder Arena on the University of Minnesota campus. Here is a look at the tournament:

TV: Championship semifinals and championship games in both classes will be televised live by 45TV.
Webcast: Daily charges for the live webcast on Prep45.com: $9.95 per day; two-day pass $16.97; three-day pass $19.87; four-day pass $23.97.
Tickets: Championship session - $17 adults, $11 students; Consolation session - $12 adults, $8 students.
Tickets can be purchased Online to avoid the lines.
Gates open: The Xcel Energy Center and Ridder Arena will open its gates to fans one hour prior to the first scheduled game of the day.

  2017 State Girls Hockey Tournament-Class A
Quarterfinals
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Semifinals
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Final
2/25/2017 4:00 PM @ Xcel
3rd Place
2/25/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
Consolation - Semifinals
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Consolation - Final
2/25/2017 10:00 AM @ Ridder Arena

  2017 State Girls Hockey Tournament-Class AA
Quarterfinals
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Semifinals
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Final
2/25/2017 7:00 PM @ Xcel
3rd Place
2/25/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
Consolation - Semifinals
Summary/Box
Summary/Box
Consolation - Final
2/25/2017 12:00 PM @ Ridder Arena
      
State Girls Gymnastics Tournament
Home Page Photo The State Girls' Gymnastics Meet is scheduled for February 24-25 at the Sports Pavilion on the University of Minnesota campus in Minneapolis. Here is a look at the meet:

FAST FACTS
The schedule:

Team Competition: Friday, February 24 – Class A, 11 a.m.; Class AA, 6 p.m.
Individual Competition: Saturday, February 25 – Class A 11 a.m., Class AA 6 p.m.
Webcast: All events will be webcast live on Prep45.grandstadium.tv. There is a daily charge of $9.95 or a two-day rate of $16.97.
Tickets: $12 adults, $8 students.
Ticket Box Offices open: 10 a.m. each day.

Class A Details
The two-time defending champions from Detroit Lakes return with 10 gymnasts who competed in the state meet last year. The Detroit Lakes team includes students from Frazee. All seven additional teams that competed in the 2017 team competition also return: Melrose Area, runner-up; Becker, third; Austin, fourth; Watertown-Mayer/Mound Westonka, fifth; Mankato West, sixth; Mahtomedi, seventh; and Worthington, which includes students from Adrian and Fulda, eighth.

Nineteen of 30 event medal-winners will return for the 2017 Class A individual competition and a new champion will emerge on uneven bars.

Four medal-winners, including defending champion Emma Disse of Detroit Lakes, return in the floor exercise. The others are: Kayla Austing of Melrose Area, runner-up; Maddie Mullenbach of Austin, third; and Sawyer Gorman of Pine Island, sixth.

Mady Brinkman of Melrose Area is the highest returning medalist in the uneven bars. She placed second in 2016. Three additional medal-winners return: Carly Breitenfeldt of Perham, third; Maddie Mullenbach of Austin, fourth; and Jennifer Boyle of Austin, sixth.

Defending champion Maddie Mullenbach of Austin and Cora Okeson of Detroit Lakes, who placed second, both return on the balance beam. They will be joined by Mady Brinkman of Melrose Area and Taryn Sellner of Mankato West, who placed fourth and sixth, respectively.

Three medalists return on the vault: defending champion Greta Klaphake of Melrose Area; Maddie Mullenbach of Austin, fourth; and Jada Olsen of Perham, sixth.

Defending champion Maddie Mullenbach of Austin will be joined by three additional returning medal-winners in the all-around. They are: Cora Okeson of Detroit Lakes, runner-up; Mady Brinkman of Melrose Area, fourth; and Kayla Austing of Melrose Area, fifth.

Class AA Details
St. Cloud Tech, which includes students from St. Cloud Cathedral, returns as the defending champion. The Tigers return with six gymnasts from last year's team. In addition to St. Cloud Tech, four other teams also return from the 2016 field: East Ridge of Woodbury, third; Cambridge-Isanti, fifth; Owatonna, sixth; and Lakeville North, eighth. Stillwater Area, Maple Grove, and Minnetonka are the final qualifying teams.

Fourteen of 30 event medal-winners in 2016 will return for 2017 Class AA individual competition.A new champion will be crowned in four events.

Runner-up Kayla Soplata of Roseville Area is the highest returning medalist in the balance beam. Three other medal-winners also return: Amanda Montplaisir of Buffalo, fourth; Chaney Neu of Champlin Park, fifth; and Madi Peters of Buffalo, sixth.

Four medalists, including defending champion Sophie Redding of Henry Sibley of Mendota Heights, return from last year's field. The other returning medal-winners are: Hailey Illi of Park Center of Brooklyn Park, third; Liz Hammond of Champlin Park, fourth; and Chaney Neu of Champlin Park, fifth.

Hannah Tuomela of Anoka and Ashley Goodlund of Lakeville North return in the uneven bars. They placed third and sixth last year, respectively.

Three medalists return in the floor exercise: Teagan Ramboldt of Eagan, third; Chaney Neu of Champlin Park, fourth; and Jessica Strecker of Roseville Area, sixth.

Chaney Neu of Champlin Park is the only returning medal-winner in the all-around. She is looking to improve on last year's runner-up showing.

2016 STATE TOURNAMENT RECAP
Class A: Detroit Lakes, which included students from Frazee, won all four events on its way to capturing its second consecutive team title. The Lakers finished with a final score of 150.225. Melrose Area was second (147.025) and Becker placed third (144.325). Maddie Mullenbach of Austin won the all-around title with a score of 38.1375. She also placed first in the balance beam after that event went to tie-breaker criteria. Mullenbach tallied a 9.5875 and Cora Okeson of Detroit Lakes posted a 9.5625. Greta Klaphake of Melrose Area and Mallary Dick of Big Lake won on the vault and uneven parallel bars, respectively. Emma Disse of Detroit Lakes claimed championship honors in the floor exercise.
Class AA: The Tigers of St. Cloud Tech won their first championship with 149.125 points. St. Cloud Tech, which included students from St. Cloud Cathedral, placed first in the vault, uneven bars, and floor exercise. The four-time defending champions from Roseville Area placed second (147.925) and East Ridge of Woodbury was third (147.375). Megan Trollen of East Ridge won both the all-around and balance beam titles in the individual competition. The other Class AA individual champions were: Sophie Redding of Henry Sibley of Mendota Heights on the vault; Natalia Jacobson of Rochester Century on the uneven bars; and Wren Anderson of East Ridge in the floor exercise.      
Advance News Release


On The Ice And Off, Blaine’s Emily Brown Is A Leader
Posted by John Millea(jmillea@mshsl.org)- Updated 2/23/2017 6:19:49 PM

In this age of single-sport specialization, Emily Brown is a throwback. The Blaine senior is a member of her school’s soccer, hockey and track squads and is a team captain for all three. In fact, this is her third season as a captain on the Bengals hockey team.

The Bengals are flying high on the ice after defeating Roseau 7-1 in Thursday’s Class 2A state quarterfinals at Xcel Energy Center. They will face Hill-Murray in Friday’s semifinals. Emily, who plays defense, had one goal and one assist in Thursday’s game, giving her 15 goals, 28 assists and 43 points this season.

Her accolades are far-ranging: She won a gold medal with last year’s U18 national team and is one of five finalists for the Ms. Hockey Award. She will play collegiate hockey at the University of Minnesota. She has been named the winner of Blaine’s Athena Award, which is bestowed on the school’s top female athlete. She has a 4.0 grade-point average and ranks No. 1 in her class.

But there’s more. A lot more. Blaine girls hockey coach Steve Guider calls Emily “perhaps the most self-disciplined person I have ever met. You have to witness Emily amongst her teammates and peers to really see how truly special she is. She changes the lives of people around her.”

The Bengals have a team motto this season that has nothing to do with hockey and everything to do with serving others. The motto is “Make A Difference” and the goal is to make a difference in at least one person’s life every day.

“Emily has embraced this, she has led our team effort by leading our weekly team Make a Difference projects where they visit senior centers or bring treats to the police department and similar things,” Guider said.

Those outreach efforts can include simple things like holding a door for someone, picking up trash at school or buying coffee for the person behind them in line at Caribou.

“This group of players is the most incredible group of kids I’ve ever coached,” Guider said. “They’re great hockey players but they’re far better students and people than hockey players.

“You watch them interact with little kids, how they stand for the national anthem, little things like that. We’ve talked about making a difference in the lives of people.”

Emily said, “It’s pretty incredible to see the effect that such a little action we perform can have on a person. We go to senior living centers and spend time with them, and just to see how much their day is made by talking about what they had for lunch or what they’re having for dinner, the games they’re playing. It’s pretty sweet to see.”

Playing three sports, getting straight A’s and contributing to the community means very little down time. Emily said she has learned to manage her time, even if it means doing homework in the car while her mom drives her to practice.

“There’s lots of homework and it can mean staying up a little bit later than usual,” she said. “It’s tough but it’s a good skill to learn.”

On the ice Brown is a tremendous competitor. She is not a highly vocal team leader but what her coach calls “a calming presence.”

“It doesn’t matter how much pressure she is under, she never gets rattled,” Guider said. “During games if we have a bad period Emily will come into the locker room and say, ‘Stay calm, settle down, get focused, we got this.’ If we are playing well she will make statements like, ‘Keep it up, we’re doing great, keep the energy going.’ If it’s a big game and competitive she will make statements like, ‘This is fun, this is why we play this game’ She has a great read on her teammates and all of her statements have a positive spin to them to keep her teammates relaxed and positive.”

Blaine girls soccer coach Scott Zachmann has similar praise for Emily.

“In 20 years of coaching at many levels -- college, high school and youth -- I can honestly say I have never met a more dedicated student-athlete than Emily,” he said. “She embodies what it means to be a student-athlete as she is disciplined in success in both academics and athletics. Great leaders make everyone around them aspire to be better. Emily does that. She inspires her coaches, her teammates, her teachers to become better versions of themselves every day.

“As her soccer coach the past four years I saw daily her impact. She led by example, hard work and commitment. A true leader cares not only about others and about how hard she needs to work for success, but cares about sportsmanship. It has always been important to Emily to show true character. She's the first to hand the ball to the other team, pick up a puck for an official or stay after practice to help put equipment away. She’s not looking for a pat on the back, she's just that kind of person. There is not a better representative of the word leadership.”

If Emily has one fear, it’s a fear of heights. Or as she told me with a smile, “I’m more like afraid of falling.”

During a hockey team-building trip to Camp Ripley, the players went through a confidence course that included vertical challenges such as a 30-foot cargo net that the players had to climb, go over and come down the other side. Guider said, “Emily is deathly afraid of heights. She was standing in line and you could just see the fear in her eyes. Just before it was her turn, she said, “I really don’t want to do this, but I don’t want to be that 80-year-old woman sitting in a wheelchair saying I never went up that rope.”

So up she went, fears and all.

“I ended up doing that and the feeling at the end was pretty incredible,” she said. “So now I won’t be that 80-year-old woman, so mission accomplished.”

BY THE NUMBERS
*Schools/teams John has seen/visited: 459
*Miles John has driven in the Toyota Camry in 2016-17: 8,457
*Follow John on Twitter: @MSHSLjohn





More of John's Journal
State Wrestling Tournament
Home Page Photo A team champion in wrestling has been crowned at the Minnesota State High School League’s state tournament since 1938. The annual tradition continues Thursday, March 2 with 24 teams in three enrollment classifications chasing a championship at the Xcel Energy Center in downtown St. Paul. Here is a look at the team tournament:

Webcast: Charges for the live webcast on Prep45.com: $9.95 per day; two-day pass $16.97; three-day pass $19.87.
Tickets: Single session --- $14 adults, $9 students. Daily pass --- $26 adults, $17 students.
Gates open: The Xcel Energy Center opens its gates to fans one hour prior to the first scheduled match of the session.


  2017 State Team Wrestling Tournament-Class A
Quarterfinals
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
Semifinals
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
Final
3/2/2017 7:00 PM @ Xcel
3rd Place
3/2/2017 5:00 PM @ Xcel
Consolation - Semifinals
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
Consolation - Final
3/2/2017 5:00 PM @ Xcel

  2017 State Team Wrestling Tournament-Class AA
Quarterfinals
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
Semifinals
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
Final
3/2/2017 7:00 PM @ Xcel
3rd Place
3/2/2017 5:00 PM @ Xcel
Consolation - Semifinals
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
Consolation - Final
3/2/2017 5:00 PM @ Xcel

  2017 State Team Wrestling Tournament-Class AAA
Quarterfinals
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 9:00 AM @ Xcel
Semifinals
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 1:00 PM @ Xcel
Final
3/2/2017 7:00 PM @ Xcel
3rd Place
3/2/2017 5:00 PM @ Xcel
Consolation - Semifinals
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
3/2/2017 11:00 AM @ Xcel
Consolation - Final
3/2/2017 5:00 PM @ Xcel
      

Coaching: A Path With Heart
Why do I coach? The legendary football coach Vince Lombardi was famous for his belief in teaching fundamentals of the game. On the first day of training camp with a football in hand, Coach walked to the front of the room, took several seconds to look over his team in silence, held out the ball in front of him and said, "Gentlemen, this is a football." Coach Lombardi made this statement to remind his team that for them to be successful they must start with fundamentals. The same holds true as we begin to intentionally develop the inner lives of our student-athletes through their sports experience.

The fundamentals begin with you and your transformational purpose of WHY you coach. To understand this question, you must take time, slow down and reflect on what really keeps you showing up to the students participating on your team and conversely, what might be getting in your way? How much time do you take to reflect on what is truly important? How are you molding the students you coach? Are you only concerned with them becoming better athletes or are you being intentional about growing them into better people? In the book A Path With Heart, author Jack Kornfield states, "We have become so busy with our daily affairs and thoughts that we have forgotten this essential art of taking time to converse with our heart. When we ask it about our current path, we must look at the values we have chosen to live by. Where do we put our time, our strength, our creativity, our love? We must look at our life without sentimentality, exaggeration, or idealism. Does what we are choosing reflect what we most deeply value?"

Reflecting on your highest held values and developing a clear Transformational Coaching Purpose will assist you in focusing first on the students you are entrusted with to grow and develop as human beings. But writing it alone does not make it a reality. You must be fully committed to it and personally own it. Your PURPOSE should be one sentence, short, succinct, easy to memorize and self-explanatory.

"I coach to help boys and girls become men and women of empathy and integrity who will lead, be responsible and change the world for good."
–Joe Ehrmann's Transformational Purpose

After reflection and writing your Transformational Purpose, take time to reflect on why it is important to you personally. Share with staff, students and parents your deeply held values and how your life led you to this PURPOSE. It takes courage to share yourself and be "real," but it is the key to transformational coaching and mentoring students. They want to know who you are. Give students an opportunity to ask questions or share comments to help understand you and your purpose. Purpose is why something exists; it's the reason you coach and determines the lifelong impact you will or won't make on every student's life.

It takes courage and commitment to share your values and explain why they are important to you, and to your team. Ask your students to comment, ask questions and discuss your values. It is important for them to understand each value, their importance to you and the value-based expectations you have for your students to enact these values on and off the field or court.

In the current win-at-all-costs sports culture, we too often forget our WHY and the way we are showing up to our students. Kornfield states, "If you have the privilege of being with a person who is aware at the time of his or her death, you find the questions such a person asks are very simple. 'Did I love well?' 'Did I live fully?' 'Did I learn to let go?' The reality is when you get to the end of your life and look back, you won't be concerned with how many state championships or games you won, but you will be concerned with the depth of your relationships and how you impacted the young people you had the privilege to coach. Love them well—the students you coach are in desperate need of love, acceptance and belonging. Live life fully—they need you to show them how to be real, authentic and joyful. Let go—of old coaching paradigms to help them live, play and grow without negativity and judgment. Take time to search your heart and reflect on these questions— 'Did I love well?' 'Did I live fully?' 'Did I learn to let go?' and you will coach with heart which will positively impact both you and your students for a lifetime.
      

League News
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2017 ExCEL Award Winners 
February 2 Board Meeting Synopsis 
MSHSL, 45TV extend broadcast partnership 
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John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
2h ago
Saturday's girls state hockey championship games @XcelEnergyCtr1A/ St. Paul United vs. Blake, 4 p.m.
2A/ Blaine vs. Edina, 7 p.m.

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
2h ago
Class 2A girls state hockey tournament semifinalsEdina 4
Eden Prairie 0

Amy Doherty
@MSHSL_Amy
2h ago
I don't know about the rest of you, but I thought Gymnastics today was a blast! And there's MORE tomorrow. Class A at 11, AA at 6

MSHSL 3h ago
Congratulations to the Lakeville North gymnastics team for winning the Class 2A team state championship.Complete results: http://www.mshsl.org/mshsl/upload/MSHSL205919Team-AA.pdf

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
3h ago
Complete results from Class 2A team state gymnastics:
mshsl.org/mshsl/upload/M

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
3h ago
Congratulations to Lakeville North, Class 2A state gymnastics team champion.

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
3h ago
2A team gymnastics
1 Lakeville North
2 St. Cloud Tech
3 Owatonna
4 Cambridge-Isanti
5 Stillwater
6 Maple Grove
7 East Ridge
8 Minnetonka

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
3h ago
Awards: 2A gymnastics periscope.tv/w/a3-Z7TF6dktO

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
3h ago
Awards ceremony: 2A gymnastics. periscope.tv/w/a3-ZlTF6dktO

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
4h ago
Competition has ended at Class 2A state team gymnastics. I'll Periscope the awards ceremony in 10 minutes or so.

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
4h ago
At the ORANGE shoe store...

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
4h ago
I don't know where to buy orange shoes but the gymnastics coaches from St. Cloud Tech do.

MSHSL 4h ago
Girls hockey state semifinalsClass 1A
--St. Paul United 4, Warroad 2
--Blake 4, Northfield 1Class 2A
--Blaine 5, Hill-Murray 1
--Edina vs. Eden Prairie

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
4h ago
Class 2A girls hockey state semifinalsBlaine 5
Hill-Murray 1Next: Edina vs. Eden Prairie

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
5h ago
Hometown pride is having your school logo tattooed on your back. This is Owatonna gymnast Rebecca Olson.

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
5h ago
And this ...

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
5h ago
This...

John Millea
@MSHSLjohn
5h ago
Four rotations are complete at Class 2A girls state team gymnastics. Four more to go.



 


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