Home      Administration




Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/31/2018 4:07:19 PM

State Soccer Semifinals and Championship Games
At U.S. Bank Stadium

Tuesday, Oct. 30

Class 2A girls: Minnetonka 1, Eagan 0 (4-3 shootout)
Class 2A girls: Wayzata 2, Stillwater 1 (7-6 shootout)
Class 1A girls: Mahtomed 2, Holy Angels 1
Class 1A girls: Orono 2, Benilde-St. Margaret’s 1
Class 1A boys: Blake 3, Austin 1
Class 1A boys: Bemidji 3, Holy Angels

Wednesday, Oct. 31
Class 1A girls third-place game: Holy Angels 0, Benilde-St. Margaret’s 0
Class 1A boys third-place game: Austin 1, Holy Angels 0
Class 2A boys: Duluth East 2, Minnetonka 0
Class 2A boys: Stillwater 2, St. Paul Central 1
Class 2A girls third-place game: Eagan 4, Stillwater 2

Friday, Nov. 2
8 a.m. Class 2A boys third-place game: Minnetonka vs. St. Paul Central
10 a.m. Class 1A girls championship game: Mahtomedi vs. Orono
12:30 p.m. Class 1A boys championship game: Blake vs. Bemidji
3 p.m. Class 2A girls championship game: Minnetonka vs. Wayzata
5:30 p.m. Class 2A boys championship game: Duluth East vs. Stillwater

Championship games will be streamed online for free here: http://prepspotlight.tv/MSHSL



Duluth East Soccer Family Goes The Distance
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/30/2018 3:45:48 PM

Chris Francis was on his cell phone, talking with a reporter. The reporter was in Minnesota and Francis was 12 hours away. Appropriately, he was in his car at a soccer field.

Francis’ son Eddie, 11, was on the field in the Cincinnati area. That’s where the Francis family lives, with one exception. High school senior William Francis lives in Duluth and will be on the field at U.S. Bank Stadium for Wednesday’s Class 2A state semifinals between Duluth East and Minnetonka.

It’s a pretty wild story involving a family that moved from Duluth to Cincinnati when Chris took a new job, with one of their children staying behind to finish his senior soccer season back in Minnesota.

The Ohio portion of the family (they actually live across the Ohio River in Union, Kentucky) will be at the stadium on Wednesday. Should the Greyhounds win, they will meet either Stillwater or St. Paul Central in Friday’s state championship game. If not, they will play in Friday’s third-place game.

Chris, wife Stephanie and sons Eddie, 11, and Sam, 15, along with daughter Cabrilla, 19, will end an odyssey that began when Chris left his job with the Duluth YMCA to become chief operating officer at YMCA of Greater Cincinnati. That happened in September of 2017 and the rest of the family moved when the school year ended last spring. Cabrilla is taking a gap year in Colorado before starting college.

That means Chris has made dozens of trips – some flying, some driving – to see William (pictured) play soccer back in Minnesota. Other family members have sometimes joined him, but school has been a roadblock for Sam and Eddie.

For years Eddie was a ball boy for the Greyhounds. “He knows those boys so well, he knows what balls they use and what shoes they wear,” Chris said. “When I leave and don’t take him, he’s really upset.”

Chris flew to Minneapolis for last Thursday’s state quarterfinals where Duluth East defeated Minnetonka 4-2 at Chisago Lakes. He landed at 2 p.m. and was back on an outbound flight at 6 a.m. the next day; he has been at all four of the Greyhounds’ postseason games.

“He’s been to a lot of games,” William said. “A lot more than you would expect.”

William, who will graduate at the end of the fall semester and rejoin his family, has been living with the family of teammates and twins Sean and Ryan Breuninghaus. “They’re great friends, good guys, and it’s been a great experience,” he said. “I had to stay here, I wanted to go off with a state championship.”

Chris said, “They came to us and said, ‘We’d really like to have him stay and he’s welcome to stay at our house.’ ”

William leads the Greyhounds (who finished third at state last year) with 27 goals in 20 games; he also has eight assists for 35 points. Teammate Seth Hoffman has 14 goals, 23 assists and 37 points. Duluth East comes to U.S. Bank Stadium as the top-seeded team with a record of 18-0-2; the ties came against Minnetonka and Duluth Denfeld. The game with Minnetonka (14-2-4) was played in Duluth on Sept. 1.

After Friday’s season-ending game, the family will spend the rest of the weekend in Duluth before driving back to Ohio/Kentucky. Chris, for one, will be very happy to have no more long trips scheduled.

“It’s a 12-hour drive and it gets long and boring,” he said. “I listen to a lot of books on tape, sports on satellite radio.

“It’s kind of funny; I’m in the hole on vacation days and I haven’t taken a vacation. It will be good on vacation days and the pocketbook when it’s over.”

State Soccer Tournament
At U.S. Bank Stadium

Tuesday, Oct. 30

Class 2A girls: Minnetonka 1, Eagan 0 (4-3 shootout)
Class 2A girls: Wayzata 2, Stillwater 1 (7-6 shootout)
Class 1A girls: Mahtomedi 2, Holy Angels 1
Class 1A girls: Orono 2, Benilde-St. Margaret’s 1
Class 1A boys: Blake 3, Austin 1
Class 1A boys: Bemidji 3, Holy Angels 1

Wednesday, Oct. 31
8 a.m. Class 1A girls third-place game: Holy Angels vs. Benilde-St. Margaret's
10 a.m. Class 1A boys third-place game: Austin vs. Holy Angels
Noon Class 2A boys: Duluth East vs. Minnetonka
2 p.m. Class 2A boys: Stillwater vs. St. Paul Central
4 p.m. Class 2A girls third-place game: Eagan vs. Stillwater

Friday, Nov. 2
8 a.m. Class 2A boys third-place game
10 a.m. Class 1A girls championship game: Mahtomedi vs. Orono
12:30 p.m. Class 1A boys championship game: Blake vs. Bemidji
3 p.m. Class 2A girls championship game: Minnetonka vs. Wayzata
5:30 p.m. Class 2A boys championship game

Follow John on Twitter: @MSHSLjohn



Spartans For Life: Lessons Learned On The Football Field
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/27/2018 7:21:00 PM

WATERVILLE -- Spending time on the sideline at sporting events – and on the field of play after contests come to an end -- you see and hear different things. Some are fantastic, some are troubling. I witnessed something Saturday that was extremely inspirational and says a lot about what high school activities can mean to our kids and communities.

Before I go into details on what took place Saturday, we need some important perspective, because everything isn’t always peaches and cream at high school games. This fall I saw two things that made me sick to my stomach: 1) An adult, upset with the officials, yelled something so vile I won’t repeat it here; 2) In the final seconds of a soccer game, two opposing players got tangled up in pursuit of the ball. As they went down to the turf, one of them wrapped the other in a headlock and pulled it tight, then punched the other kid in the stomach. He got up as the final horn blew on his team’s victory, looked at the person he had just punched and waved “bye-bye.” It was despicable.

I don’t know how those things can be stopped, but what transpired Saturday afternoon after a football game was unlike anything I’ve ever seen. The setting was the football field in Waterville, home of the Waterville-Elysian-Morristown Buccaneers. They hosted the Spartans of St. Clair/Mankato Loyola in a Class 2A Section 2 semifinal playoff game.

Both teams came in with 8-1 records, but this was expected to be a tough lift for the Spartans. The kids from St. Clair and Mankato Loyola almost didn’t get to play football at all this season. Neither school had enough available boys to field a team, so they formed a cooperative team for the first time.

Had each school fielded a team, they both would have been assigned to Class 1A. But the coop system means the two schools had to use their combined enrollment, and that number bumped them up into Class 2A for the postseason. During the regular season, six of the Spartans’ eight opponents were 1A teams.

Waterville-Elysian-Morristown opened the season with a four-point loss to Redwood Valley and hasn’t been beaten since. Saturday’s result was a 35-13 victory over St. Clair/Mankato Loyola, moving the Buccaneers into next Friday’s section championship game against New Richland-Hartland-Ellendale-Geneva.

W-E-M is an impressive team. Grant McBroom ran for a touchdown and threw to Tanner Ranslow for two scores. The Buccaneers defense made things tough for the Spartans, but the visiting team had some highlights. The biggest came on the Spartans’ third possession, when senior Noah Schruin sprinted 97 yards for a touchdown to forge a 7-7 tie. That pushed Noah past 3,000 career yards.

And to think … he and his teammates almost didn’t have a season at all.

After the game ended at 4:08 p.m., the teams shook hands; players, coaches, managers, cheerleaders in a long, snaking line across the middle of the field. The coaches from St. Clair/Mankato Loyola congratulated the kids and coaches from W-E-M, saying, “Good luck,” “Keep winning, boys” and “Keep it going.”

The Spartans then walked slowly to the north end zone, where they kneeled as head coach Dustin Bosshart spoke to them. Before practice began in August, some of the now-teammates didn’t know each other. And here they were, at the end of the season, brothers, kneeling, some of them in tears and all of them emotional that the end had come.

Bosshart, who is the principal at St. Clair and represents the Minnesota Association of Secondary School Principals on the MSHSL board of directors, talked to the boys about togetherness, memories, pride and the future.

He thanked them for working so hard and giving everything they had to the team. He talked about the bonds they had formed not only with each other but with their coaches, who come from both schools.

“The coaches who coached you will be there for you for the rest of your lives,” Bosshart said.

“You will remember the lifetime memories you created,” he said as sniffles were heard. “You did it the right way.

“You are a great group and you will accomplish incredible things in your life. Spartan family for life, that’s what you guys are.”

Think about that. Spartans for life. For sports in which the schools don’t have cooperative teams, kids from St. Clair are Cyclones and Mankato Loyola teams are the Crusaders. But during football season, everyone is a Spartan.

With the coach’s remarks complete, the players broke it down for the final time. The boys stood, gathered in a tight bunch, raised their hands together in the middle and said, “One, two three! Brothers!”

Bosshart walked to his wife Cheryl and gave her a kiss. The players’ families and friends stood 20 or so yards away, waiting for the team’s private moment to end. And then another incredible thing happened: It didn’t end.

The players remained together, some hugging, some finding one or more of the coaches to say thank you and share an embrace. Coaches patted boys on the helmet, returned the thank you and told them they loved them. The boys then gathered together once more – not wanting the moment to end -- each of them kneeling, for a few private words. Helmets removed and heads bowed, they prayed.

And then, only then, did the boys begin reuniting with their families. A strapping teenager hugged his grandpa and wept on his shoulder. Moms, dads, friends offered congratulations and condolences on the end of a great season.

“We’ve talked about it all year,” Bosshart said quietly, standing in the end zone. “This is about more than football.”

Good job, Spartans. Well done.

Follow John on Twitter: @MSHSLjohn



Traveling Trophies: Paddles, Axes, Bells, Jugs, Sand Bags And More
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/24/2018 10:18:04 AM

On Oct. 14 in this space, I wrote about a football game between Chatfield and St. Charles. The story included information about the Armistice Day Trophy, which those teams have been playing for since 1947.

Seeing that trophy on the field in St. Charles reminded me of some of the other great traveling trophies I have seen during many years of writing about high school football in Minnesota. The Hammer. The Milk Jug. The Battle Axe. At least nine rivalry games are known as the Battle for the Paddle.

There are at least two Little Brown Jugs, one Victory Jug, one Brown Jug and at least two trophies known simply as the Jug. Several trophies are named after highways or streets.

I asked folks who follow me on Twitter and are plugged into the MSHSL Facebook page to tell me about their favorite football traveling trophies. The response was immediate and powerful. If you haven’t seen the many photos of trophies that have been posted on the MSHSL Facebook page, you really should because it is quite amazing.

People also have shared some interesting, weird, sometimes goofy stories of how the trophies came to be. Here are a few samples…

--Plainview-Elgin-Millville football coach Kevin Lamb and Lake City coach Trevor Narum were college roommates in Winona, living on Franklin Street. So, their teams play for the Franklin Street Helmet.

--After football players from Janesville-Waldorf-Pemberton and St. Clair helped fill and set sand bags when their communities suffered from flooding in 2016, the Sand Bag Trophy was born.

--Proctor and Hermantown play for The Hammer, a giant wooden hammer that is a symbol of the railroad history of the two towns.

--St. Charles and Lewiston-Altura play for TWO trophies. In the mid-2000s coaches from both schools thought it would be fun to have a traveling trophy. Each team created a trophy (unbeknownst to the other school). Lewiston-Altura decorated a golden hammer with the handle half orange and half red, while St. Charles created the Highway 14 Sign.

--In Rochester, the football teams from Century, Mayo and John Marshall battle for The Addington Jug. The school that beats the team possessing the jug takes it home and paints it in their school colors.

--Luverne and Pipestone have played for the Battle Ax (pictured) since 1957. The ax head is red on one side and green on the other, representing the schools’ colors. And for good (and hilarious) measure, the sophomore teams play for the Hatchet and the ninth-grade teams play for the Butter Knife.

Here’s a list of football traveling trophies that has been compiled based on input from so many of you. This is in no way a complete list and some of these rivalries are no longer current. But what a fun project!

FOOTBALL TRAVELING TROPHIES

Addington Jug

Rochester Century, Rochester Mayo and Rochester John Marshall

Armistice Day Trophy
Chatfield vs. St. Charles

Axe
Minnesota School for the Deaf vs. Wisconsin School for the Deaf
Bemidji vs. Moorhead

Bay Bell
Minnetonka vs. Wayzata

Babe’s Bell
Bemidji vs. Brainerd

Battle Ax
Luverne vs. Pipestone (Hatchet and Butter Knife)

Battle for the Apple
Apple Valley vs. Eastview

Battle of the Bell
Houston vs. Lanesboro

Battle for the Paddle
Rogers vs. Elk River
Cambridge-Isanti vs. St. Francis
Hawley vs. Barnesville
Annandale vs. Litchfield
Anoka vs. Champlin Park
Medford vs. Bethlehem Academy
Littlefork-Big Falls vs. Bigfork
Detroit Lakes vs. Peham
Jackson County Central vs. Windom

Big Cat

Lakeville North vs. Lakeville South

Block
Irondale vs. Spring Lake Park

Bloomington City Trophy
Bloomington Jefferson vs. Bloomington Kennedy

Brown Jug
Waconia vs. Chaska

Bumper
Foley vs. Little Falls

Football
Morris Area/Chokio-Alberta vs. Minnewaska

Franklin Street Helmet
Plainview-Elgin-Millville vs. Lake City

Golden Helmet

Kittson County Central vs. Grygla

Golden Football
Mahnomen/Waubun vs. Ada-Borup/West

Hammer
Proctor vs. Hermantown (pictured)
Lewiston-Altura vs. St. Charles

Hatchet
St. Paul Harding vs. St. Paul Johnson

Helmet
Tracy-Milroy-Balaton vs. Murray County Central
St. Charles vs. Dover-Eyota

Highway 2 Road Sign Trophy
Fosston vs. Bagley

Highway 14 Sign
St. Charles vs. Lewiston-Altura

Highway 53 Bridge Battle
Virginia vs. Eveleth
Highway 99 Border Battle
Nicollet vs. Cleveland

37th Avenue Street Sign
Minneapolis Edison vs. Columbia Heights

Jug
Mankato East vs. Mankato West
Greenway vs. Grand Rapids

Little Brown Jug
Fairmont vs. Blue Earth Area
Zumbrota-Mazeppa vs. Kasson-Mantorville
Cannon Falls vs. Kenyon-Wanamingo
Moose Lake/Willow River vs. Barnum

Minute Man
North St. Paul vs. Tartan

Morrison County Milk Jug
Royalton vs. Upsala/Swanville Area

Musket
St. Paul Central vs. St. Paul Highland Park

Nickel
Roseau vs. Warroad

Old Highway 169 Blvd Trophy
Jordan vs. Belle Plaine

Old Oak Bucket
Fairmont vs. Jackson County Central

Sandbag Trophy
St Clair vs. Janesville-Waldorf-Pemberton

Sledgehammer
Rogers vs. Monticello
Caledonia vs. Plainview-Elgin-Millville

Stump Trophy
Crosby-Ironton vs. Aitkin

Tractor Trophy
Farmington vs. Northfield

Victory Jug
Chaska vs. Chanhassen

Wedge
Norwood Young America vs. Sibley East

See more photos on the MSHSL Facebook page.

Follow John on Twitter: @MSHSLjohn



Final Class 1A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/24/2018 10:14:53 AM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 1A
1. Minneota (14) - 210
2. Waterville-Elysian-Morristown - 193
3. Mayer Lutheran - 179
4. Wabasso - 164
5. Pine River-Backus - 155
6. Mabel-Canton - 135
7. Ada-Borup-West - 121
8. BOLD - 118
9. Windom - 76
10. Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa - 72
Others Receiving Votes: Carlton - 19, Caledonia - 12,
Teams only appearing on one ballot: Yellow Medicine East, New Life Academy



Final Class 2A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/24/2018 10:14:27 AM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 2A
1. Kasson-Mantorville (12) - 180
2. Stewartville - 168
3. Concordia Academy - 150
4. Marshall - 140
5. North Branch - 130
6. Academy of Holy Angels - 108
7. Belle Plaine - 104
8. Kenyon-Wanamingo - 89
9. Sauk Centre - 56
10. Watertown-Mayer - 45
Others Receiving Votes: Glencoe-Silver Lake - 23, St. Cloud Cathedral - 22, Norwood-Young America - 21, Jackson County Central - 13
Teams only appearing on one ballot: SW Christian



Final Class 3A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/24/2018 10:13:53 AM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 3A
1. Eagan (5) - 172
2. Lakeville North (4) - 167
3. Champlin Park (3) - 165
4. Lakeville South - 143
5. Minnetonka - 126
6. Stillwater - 122
7. East Ridge - 108
8. Shakopee - 82
9. Northfield - 73
10. North St. Paul - 59
Others Receiving Votes: Moorhead - 22, Forest Lake - 13
Teams only appearing on one ballot: Wayzata



From Kasson To Springfield: The Scene Is Special
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/18/2018 12:25:17 PM

I had quite a big travel stretch in the middle of this week, spending six and a half hours behind the wheel in driving 352 miles, watching two far-flung sporting events and having more fun than should be allowed by law.

The settings were very different: an ultra-modern gymnasium and an old-school football field that before this season was only a practice field. Both sites shed a lot of light on Minnesotans’ proud commitment to high school activities and the community spirit that adds so much to the experience.

My Tuesday stop was at Kasson-Mantorville High School for one of the biggest volleyball matches of the regular season. The KoMets, ranked No. 2 in Class 2A, played host to top-ranked Stewartville at Home Federal Arena, which, yes, carries the name of a corporate sponsor. Home Federal Arena is roomy and bright, and the fantastic Kasson-Mantorville band only added to the atmosphere. Individual statistics were posted on the scoreboard, and the K-M robotics team sent a robot rolling around the court between sets, shooting T-shirts into the crowd.

The KoMets came away with a 3-1 victory over the Stewartville Tigers, and the teams are likely to meet again in the Section 1 playoffs. Kasson-Mantorville is led by 6-foot-2 senior Peyton Suess , who brings thunder at the net and will take her volleyball skills to Wake Forest University next year. The younger end of the KoMet spectrum was ninth-grader Cate Wanous, a 5-foot-5 dynamo who defied gravity in serving a couple killer kills from the left side and served six consecutive KoMets points during the fourth and final set.

After the match, the home team and fans gathered on the court to celebrate the big win. I headed home, arriving a little after 11 p.m., and was back in the John’s Journal Toyota Camry at 10 a.m. Thursday, bound for another great trip.

My first stop was New Ulm, where I had been invited to a lunch meeting of the New Ulm Club, a civic organization that is a big booster of the local sports scene. The meeting was held at Veigel’s Kaiserhoff, the most famous restaurant in New Ulm and beyond. Football coaches Denny Lux of New Ulm Cathedral, Corey Kneeshaw of New Ulm High and Jim Buboltz of Minnesota Valley Lutheran spoke about their seasons, the future of their programs and were great representatives of their schools.

Lux spoke first, because, as he explained, “I’ve gotta start taping ankles at 12:30” before the Greyhounds played a 3 o’clock game 30 miles away in Springfield. It was an important game, too, on the final day of the eight-week regular season. Murray County Central was 6-1 and had wrapped up the top seed in Class 1A Section 3, and Cathedral and Springfield were both 4-3.

“The winner’s going to get the two seed,” Lux said. “This is my 24th year of coaching, and I can tell you that the kids are working as hard as they did 24 years ago. Our kids work hard; they work hard on the practice field, they work hard in the weight room, they have a lot of enthusiasm for football.”

The scene in Springfield was special. The Tigers’ home field was washed out by summer flooding so they went to an emergency backup: Sticker Field, a plot of thick green grass tucked in between a neighborhood and a gravel pit on the south side of town. Sticker has been used mainly as a junior high baseball and softball field. This season it has been the home field of the Tigers varsity football team.

There are no lights, so the home games have been daytime affairs. A lack of electricity was solved by long orange cords. A small wheeled scoreboard was acquired (clock, score, quarter and that’s all the info you really need), industrial-grade scissor lifts are used as a press box and platforms for video cameras and assistant coaches wearing headsets. One corner of the south end zone had a pretty severe dropoff, but the sod was peeled back and more earth was moved in to level it off. There’s still a very slight uphill climb in the back of both end zones, and the back of the north end zone is about a foot from a sidewalk. But it’s a tremendous setting, thanks to hard work, ingenuity and community volunteers.

Several small sets of metal bleachers were moved to Sticker, and lots of fans sit on lawn chairs, benches, picnic tables and blankets. Tom Wheeler of KNUJ radio in New Ulm sat at a folding table on the sidewalk behind the south end zone, admitting that when he described scoring plays he was only guessing at the yardage. From Springfield’s KARZ radio, play-by-play guy Dale “Lumber” Lindmeier sat on the scissor lift that served as a press box.

Once the big game began, it turned into a surprising runaway with New Ulm Cathedral winning 43-15.

The Greyhounds run an old-old-very-old-fashioned straight T offense, which seems to be in vogue. Elk River, which also runs the straight T, has played in the last two Class 5A Prep Bowls and Lux says he got the idea from the Elks. The Greyhounds began using the offense last year; it is a confusing thing to defend, with the quarterback slipping the ball to any one of the three running backs as they dart and dash.

“I watched Elk River in the state finals and I thought, you know for a school that’s small, where you don’t have a steady stream of athletes, that deception might keep you in the game all the time,” Lux said.

Cathedral’s defense was strong against Springfield’s high-powered spread offense. In Week 7, the Tigers beat Sleepy Eye 45-42 with the teams combining for 1,061 total yards, 13 touchdowns and 87 points. But this time was different. Cathedral’s Alex Hillesheim and Jaydan Hotovec picked off first-half passes and the Springfield offense never found its groove.

At halftime, the Greyhounds walked across West Walnut Street – where their bus was parked -- and sat on a neighbor’s lawn. The Tigers gathered beside a storage shed.

Like the Kasson-Mantorville volleyball team, Cathedral’s footballers have a mix of veterans and youngsters. The talented senior class includes fullback Zach Helget, a former offensive lineman who ran for three touchdowns Wednesday, Hillesheim (caught a touchdown pass) and Josh Seidl (who scored a touchdown and does the kicking). All that offense began with a ninth-grader at quarterback, Sam Knowles. He ran for two scores and threw for one.

Maybe the Greyhounds played so well because the setting in Springfield wasn’t much different from what they see every day. Cathedral has neither a game field nor practice field at the school, so the football players walk about 10 minutes to Harman Park, where there’s enough open space to work out.

“This is a lot like that,” Lux said. “It’s in the afternoon, it almost felt like we were at a practice. Our guys adjusted to it real well. Being a running team makes a difference. We’re not so concerned about boundaries. When you’re a throwing team you’re looking for landmarks on the field and you can’t really get that feel here. It didn’t affect our offense at all.”

When the game ended, the radio guys signed off and the motors of the scissor lifts rattled to life as the humans aboard returned to earth. Lawn chairs and blankets were folded and returned to car trunks.

And just like the night before in Kasson’s modern gymnasium, athletes and families and friends gathered together on the old grass field near the edge of town, sharing congratulations, hugs and smiles.

Follow John on Twitter: @MSHSLjohn




Class 1A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/18/2018 12:18:48 PM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 1A
1. Minneota (14) - 210
2. Waterville-Elysian-Morristown - 192
3. Mayer Lutheran - 181
4. Wabasso - 163
5. Pine River-Backus - 152
6. Mabel-Canton - 135
7. Ada-Borup-West - 123
8. BOLD - 115
9. Windom - 80
10. Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa - 51
Others Receiving Votes: Caledonia - 32, Carlton - 19
Teams only appearing on one ballot: Yellow Medicine East, New Life Academy



Class 2A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/18/2018 12:18:28 PM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 2A
1. Stewartville (10) - 150
2. Kasson-Mantorville - 140
T-3. Marshall - 124
T-3. Concordia Academy - 124
5. North Branch - 107
6. Academy of Holy Angels - 84
7. Belle Plaine - 82
8. Kenyon-Wanamingo - 73
9. Watertown-Mayer - 71
10. Sauk Centre - 60
Others Receiving Votes: St. Cloud Cathedral - 22, Norwood-Young America - 13



Class 3A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/18/2018 12:18:01 PM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 3A
1. Champlin Park (10) - 163
2. Lakeville North - 153
3. Eagan (1) - 144
4. Lakeville South - 134
5. Minnetonka - 115
6. Stillwater - 111
7. East Ridge - 99
8. Shakopee - 81
9. Northfield - 70
10. North St. Paul - 58
Others Receiving Votes: Moorhead - 12
Teams only appearing on one ballot: Forest Lake, Wayzata



Homecoming In St. Charles: Saints vs. Gophers
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:57:41 PM

ST. CHARLES – When Chatfield senior running back Gage Tuohy raced 59 yards for a touchdown with 96 seconds left in Friday night’s football game, it put the wraps on a couple of things. Gage’s second touchdown sealed the Gophers’ 22-6 victory over St. Charles and kept one of the state’s oldest athletic trophies right where it was, and it also ended a day of festive events in this town of 3,700 located 25 miles east of Rochester.

The result of the Week 7 game gave both teams a record of 6-1; they came into the contest holding Top 10 rankings in Class 2A, the Saints at No. 5 and Chatfield at No. 9. The top-ranked team is nearby Caledonia, which handed the Gophers their only loss and will play host to the Saints on Wednesday as the regular season ends.

A few hours before kickoff, St. Charles High School students were packed into the gymnasium for the crowning of Homecoming royalty. The big finish was preceded by loads of fun and games, cheers and music. Competitions were held to decide the champions of eating donuts (suspended on strings) and Fruit Roll-Ups without the use of hands. There were games with key elements that included whipped cream and marshmallows, the concert choir sang, the cheerleaders cheered.

After King Isaac Davidson and Queen Megan Shanahan had been successfully crowned, the gym cleared and the streets of St. Charles were filled with the Homecoming parade … well, a street or two were busy for a few minutes. This was the epitome of a wonderful small-town parade; a police cruiser, flags carried by veterans, a fire truck, the marching band, the Homecoming royalty riding on convertibles, teams, clubs and classes marching on foot or riding in pickups and trailers. The parade wound past the elementary school – with excited little kids standing curbside and receiving low fives from big kids – then made a pair of right turns and headed down Whitewater Avenue (aka Main Street) before returning to the high school.

Brief history lesson: St. Charles was named after Saint Charles Borromeo, archbishop of the Italian city of Milan in the 1500s. Chatfield carries the name of Andrew G. Chatfield, who was a member of the Minnesota Territorial Supreme Court 300 years after Charlie’s reign as archbishop.

The setting for the football game could not have been better. The Saints football field is also the outfield for the baseball diamond, and some of the hometown students sat under blankets on comfy couches (I swear I also saw a lamp sitting on an end table) behind the west end zone. The setting sun illuminated a stand of color-shifting trees across U.S. Highway 14, and shortly before kickoff the steady clip-clop of a horse’s hooves could be heard on the highway as an Amish gentleman, flatbed wagon laden with groceries in white plastic bags, headed home from a trip to town.

After a quick 15-mile ride, the Chatfield Gophers disembarked from the bus at 6 o’clock in almost-full uniform. They strapped up their shoulder pads and pulled on their jerseys at the visitor’s bench just outside second base. They wore all white other than their maroon helmets. They looked sharp, although white pants weren’t in the original plan for this game.

A week earlier they had won at Lewiston-Altura, and mud was a main theme. The players’ moms do the football laundry for their sons, and Gophers coach Jeff Johnson had decided that, with another moist field likely after a week of rain, maroon pants would be worn at St. Charles so the moms would get a break. The players disagreed.

“I got a text from one of the kids who said, ‘Let’s keep it going with the white pants,’ ” Johnson said before kickoff. Why mess with a good thing?

The Saints wore all black with orange helmets, looking equally sharp. The St. Charles helmets carry an outstanding school logo, the letters SC underneath a halo.

As referee Tom Schultz and his crew met with the team captains for the coin toss, Tom conveyed an important message to the kids: “When you're done playing, consider becoming an official in any sports you enjoy. We need you.” This would be a great message from officials at any and all high school activities.

The game was up for grabs at halftime, with Chatfield leading 7-6. Tuohy’s first score made it 15-6 early in the third quarter before turnovers killed two Saints drives. That became a theme, especially for Chatfield senior Seth Allen, who intercepted four passes thrown by Saints sophomore Drew Maloney. Drew became the starter when senior Mark Buringa suffered a leg injury a week prior at Zumbrota-Mazeppa.

Mark had served as the master of ceremonies during the afternoon coronation ceremony, sitting behind a microphone (along with his crutches) at the scorer’s table. He watched the football game, wearing his No. 2 jersey, from the bed of a backed-up truck.

On the St. Charles sideline, two coaches walked back and forth, one wearing a headset and one wearing a well-worn ballcap. The Saints’ third-year head coach is Matt Reinhardt. His staff consists of Derrick Thompson, Nathan Whitacre and Jim Reinhardt. Matt (headphones) and Jim (ballcap) are son and dad.

Jim Reinhardt retired as the head coach at Rushford-Peterson in 2009. He had a career record of 198-68 over 24 years with the Trojans, where his teams won 23 conference championships, went to state nine times and won Class 1A state titles in 2002, 2004 and 2006. Matt Reinhardt, 33, played quarterback for Jim, 68, and became a teacher, just like his father.

“He knows a lot, he works well with the kids,” Matt said after the game. “He’s done such a good job with our offensive line this year, and our defensive line. That’s kind of made our season. And our kids really like him.”

More history: As the game ended and the teams exchanged handshakes, the Gophers ran to their bench to celebrate with what might be the oldest traveling trophy in Minnesota high school football. It’s called the Armistice Day Trophy.

Armistice Day marked the end of World War I in 1918. The end of hostilities took effect at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 that year, also known as the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. The trophy, created by American Legion posts in Chatfield and St. Charles, was first contested in 1947. In the early days of the trophy, the game was always played on Armistice Day, whether Nov. 11 fell on a Sunday, Monday, Tuesday or whenever.

The Saints won the prize in 2015 and 2016, and now the Gophers have held it for two years in a row. It’s a glorious golden football resting on a wooden base, with the scores from each game in the series inscribed on metal plates.

Friday’s game ended at 9:11 p.m. and the Gophers were hoisting the Armistice Day Trophy by 9:15. Their white uniforms carried a little mud, but the moms of Chatfield will happily make them look like new.

“That’s a good football team and we knew they were going to pound the ball like they’ve always done,” Johnson said of the Saints. “Our kids had a great game plan defensively, and we did our best to stop them. We’ve faced this offense before and it’s one thing to game prep for it, and it’s another thing to have your kids execute. And they really did.”

Somewhere, Judge Andy Chatfield is proudly proclaiming bragging rights over Saint Charlie.

--To see a photo gallery, go to the MSHSL Facebook page.

--Follow John on Twitter: @MSHSLjohn



Nine-Man Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:52:47 PM

Provided by the Associated Press.

1. Spring Grove (6-0)
2. Stephen-Argyle (6-0)
3. Verndale (5-0)
4. Cromwell-Wright (6-0)
5. Cook County (6-0)
6. Mountain Lake Area (6-0)
7. South Ridge (6-0)
8. Houston (5-1)
9. Norman County East/Ulen-Hitterdal (6-0)
10. Russell-Tyler-Ruthton (5-1)



Class 1A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:52:28 PM

Provided by the Associated Press.

1. Minneota
2. Mahnomen/Waubun
3. BOLD
4. Blooming Prairie
5. Rushford-Peterson
6. Ottertail Central
7. United South Central
8. Mayer Lutheran
9. Fertile-Beltrami
10. Goodhue



Class 2A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:52:06 PM

Provided by the Associated Press.

1. Caledonia (6-0)
2. Minneapolis North (6-0)
3. Barnesville (6-0)
4. Redwood Valley (6-0)
5. St. Charles (6-0)
6. Royalton (6-0)
7. Paynesville (5-1)
8. Hawley (5-1)
9. Chatfield (5-1)
10. W-E-M (5-1)



Class 3A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:51:32 PM

Provided by the Associated Press.

1. Pierz (6-0)
2. Rochester Lourdes (6-0)
3. Mora (6-0)
4. Spectrum (6-0)
5. New London-Spicer (5-1)
6. Breck (5-1)
7. Fairmont (5-1)
8. Annandale (5-1)
9. Jordan (5-1)
10. Albany (5-1)



Class 4A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:51:09 PM

Provided by the Associated Press.

1. Academy of Holy Angels (6-0)
2. Winona (6-0)
3. Hutchinson (6-0)
4. Detroit Lakes (6-0)
5. St. Paul Academy/Minnehaha Academy/Blake (6-0)
6. Marshall (6-0)
7. Dassel-Cokato (6-0)
8. Hermantown (6-0)
9. Providence Academy (6-0)
10. Cloquet (5-1)



Class 5A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:50:46 PM

Provided by the Associated Press.

1. Owatonna (6-0)
2. Elk River (6-0)
3. St. Thomas Academy (6-0)
4. Robbinsdale Cooper (6-0)
5. Waconia (6-0)
6. Chanhassen (5-1)
7. Mahtomedi (5-1)
8. Sauk Rapids-Rice (5-1)
9. Mankato West (5-1)
10. Bemidji (5-1)



Class 6A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:50:19 PM

Provided by the Associated Press.

1. Lakeville North (6-0)
2. Blaine (6-0)
3. Eden Prairie (5-1)
4. Edina (5-1)
5. Woodbury (5-1)
6. St. Michael-Albertville (4-2)
7. Mounds View (4-2)
8. Prior Lake (4-2)
9. Minnetonka (4-2)
10. East Ridge (4-2)



Class 2A Girls Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:49:30 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Eagan
2 Wayzata
3 Stillwater
4 East Ridge
5 Andover
6 Maple Grove
7 Edina
8 Centennial
9 Eden Prairie
10 Minnetonka



Class 2A Boys Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:49:10 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Duluth East
2 Stillwater
3 Minneapolis Washburn
4 St Louis Park
5 St Paul Central
6 Minnetonka
7 Champlin Park
8 Centennial
9 East Ridge
10 Prior Lake



Class 1A Girls Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:48:46 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Visitation
2 Hill-Murray
3 Mahtomedi
4 Waconia
5 Blake
6 Holy Angels
7 Orono
8 Benilde-St. Margaret’s
9 Mankato West
10 Monticello



Class 1A Boys Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/14/2018 5:48:21 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Totino-Grace
2 Breck
3 Holy Angels
4 Blake
5 Mahtomedi
6 Holy Family
7 Austin
8 Bemidji
9 DeLaSalle
10 Worthington



Minnesota Football Stadiums: Here’s My Top 20
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/8/2018 12:05:12 PM

I spend a lot of time at high school stadiums. And I love that part of my job. For football games I try to arrive a couple hours before kickoff, when the place is perfectly quiet. That provides a big contrast with what is to come: cheers, chants, whistles, bands, delirious screaming.

For the last few weeks I have been putting together a list of my favorite high school football fields in Minnesota. I have not seen all of them and I never will … as much as I wish I could. On Twitter I asked people to tell me about their favorite football fields, and I heard about many I have been to and some I have not yet seen.

For this exercise, I’m only listing stadiums I have seen in person. This is not any sort of definitive list, either. This is one person’s opinion and nothing more. If your favorite field is not included here, that doesn’t mean it’s not deserving.

My final list came down to 20 locations from all over Minnesota. Rather than list them in numerical order (which to me is impossible), I have placed them in several categories …

Best Modern Showplaces

--If you haven’t seen the giant tiger eyes at Farmington High School, you are missing something special. The entire stadium is first-class, with fans walking down to their seats from plazas on both sides. The school building, less than a decade old, stands beyond the south end zone; behind a glass wall on field level is a giant tiger’s face. After dark, the tiger is illuminated. It is really something.

--Buffalo High School opened a new facility recently, and it is special. The track is next door, so the football field is very close to seating on both sides. Like Farmington, there is artificial turf. The Bison have a large scoreboard with video display, adding to the long list of first-class amenities.

--Mountain Iron-Buhl plays in one of the finest new stadiums in the state. The Rangers’ turf field, which opened this fall, has bright red and gold touches and sits below very comfortable seating and a spacious plaza.

Small-Town Charm

--The press boxes in Grand Meadow and Spring Grove have multiple levels, with “luxury suites” available for fans who win raffles or auctions. A few families in Grand Meadow can sit on their backyard decks and watch the action. A superb touch in Spring Grove (as in many small towns): the football field is also the baseball outfield.

--In Cleveland, the field is sandwiched between a grassy hillside – where fans sit on lawn chairs, blankets and car hoods up in the parking lot – and a stand of trees. Very picturesque.

--Nicollet has one of the most intriguing press boxes in the state. The large multi-room structure, which used to stand above the Raceway Park auto track in Shakopee, was purchased via an online auction and put in place in Nicollet in 2014.

--In Adrian, the football field is located a few blocks from the high school. This means both teams stroll through the neighborhood on the way to the field and back. A single strand of rope marks the boundary between fans and field. A glorious example of small-town football.

American History

--The stadiums in International Falls and Bemidji were built as Works Progress Administration projects during the Great Depression of the 1930s and 1940s. Sports Stadium in International Falls features a concrete relief sculpture (pictured) of 1940s-era athletes created by a Minnesota-born sculptor named Evelyn Raymond. Scenic Chet Anderson Stadium in Bemidji has stood since 1939. Today it offers modern turf as well as historic original seating on both sides, just off the shore of Lake Bemidji.

Great Places to Watch Football

--Some spots simply offer outstanding views of the action. My favorites in this category include Jackson County Central, which has seating and press boxes on both sides of the field (with no track), and Rosemount, where the field is in a natural bowl surrounded by trees on two sides and a grass slope winding around one end of the field.

--The stadium in Esko is one of the state’s best small-school locations. There’s a turf field, scoreboard behind the visitor’s bench and cows grazing behind the scoreboard, plus a boulder at the entry emblazoned with the Finnish word “Sisu,” which is defined in several ways: extraordinary courage and determination in the face of adversity; persistence, endurance, resilience, tenacity, perseverance.

Cheer For Atmosphere

--What happens off the field is always important, and Becker High School is special in this regard. From the secret-sauce pork chops to the playing of Ram Jam’s 1977 version of “Black Betty” over the sound system every time the home team scores, Becker’s game atmosphere is tough to beat.

--The fields at Winona (pictured) and Wabasha-Kellogg, located near Mississippi River bluffs, offer striking scenery. Bluffs in the distance, an occasional bald eagle soaring overhead. Always great.

--At South St. Paul, the home team locker room is inside the school, which sits on a hill overlooking the field. This means when the Packers exit the locker room, they come down a steep dirt-and-wood staircase, as their predecessors have done for decades.

--Hutchinson has been a football school for a long, long time, and part of the Tigers’ appeal is S.R. Knutson Field. There’s nothing fancy, just natural grass, bleachers and a marvelous press box made from 2x4s and plywood. It’s old-school football at its finest.

My Two Favorites

When I began compiling notes for this project, the first two words I typed were “Anoka” and “Hastings.” Or maybe they were “Hastings” and “Anoka.” Either way, those schools lay proud claim to what I consider my favorite high school stadiums.

Goodrich Field is home of the Anoka Tornadoes and McNamara Stadium at Todd Field is home of the Hastings Raiders. Both are historic, both include grand stone walls on the perimeter, both stand proudly in the middle of town, and both have been centers of memory-making for as long as anyone can remember.

The facilities in Hastings and Anoka have been updated over the years, but both retain the charm of their early days. There is no artificial turf (although it will be coming to Hastings soon) and tradition is everywhere, especially in the stories that could be told by those old stone walls.

And no matter where the games take place, there’s nothing better than tradition.

I invite you to tell me about your favorite stadium. Send an email to jmillea@mshsl.org … I may share those in this space.

Follow John on Twitter: @MSHSLjohn




Class 1A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/7/2018 10:58:13 PM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 1A
1. Minneota (15) - 239
2. Waterville-Elysian-Morristown (1) - 218
3. Mayer Lutheran - 198
4. Wabasso - 188
5. Mabel-Canton - 168
6. Pine River-Backus - 159
7. Ada-Borup-West - 138
8. BOLD - 121
9. Windom - 94
10. Caledonia - 48
Others Receiving Votes: Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa - 40, New Life Academy - 25, Carlton - 13
Teams only appearing on one ballot: Bethlehem Academy, Yellow Medicine East, Sacred Heart



Class 2A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/7/2018 10:57:49 PM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 2A
1. Stewartville (11) - 179
2. Kasson-Mantorville (1) - 169
3. Marshall - 150
4. Concordia Academy - 145
5. North Branch - 129
6. Kenyon-Wanamingo - 103
7. Sauk Centre - 102
8. Belle Plaine - 94
9. Academy of Holy Angels - 79
10. Watertown-Mayer - 72
Others Receiving Votes: SW Christian - 23
Teams only appearing on one ballot: JCC, St. Cloud Cathedral



Class 3A Volleyball Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/7/2018 10:57:25 PM

From the Minnesota Volleyball Coaches Association.

CLASS 3A
1. Champlin Park (9) - 148
2. Lakeville North - 140
3. Eagan (1) - 132
4. Lakeville South - 120
5. East Ridge - 114
6. Minnetonka - 100
7. Stillwater - 85
8. Shakopee - 77
9. Northfield - 66
10. North St. Paul - 49
Others Receiving Votes - Forest Lake - 19
Teams only appearing on one ballot: none



Nine-Man Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:56:55 PM

From the Associated Press.

NINE-MAN
1. Spring Grove
2. Stephen-Argyle
3. Verndale
4. Cromwell-Wright
5. Houston
6. Cook County
7. Mountain Lake Area
8. South Ridge
9. Norman County East/Ulen-Hitterdal
10. Russell-Tyler-Ruthton



Class 1A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:56:37 PM

From the Associated Press.

CLASS 1A
1. Minneota
2. Mahnomen/Waubun
3. BOLD
4. Blooming Prairie
5. Rushford-Peterson
6. Ottertail Central
7. United South Central
8. Mayer Lutheran
9. Fertile-Beltrami
10. Goodhue



Class 2A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:56:15 PM

From the Associated Press.

CLASS 2A
1. Caledonia (5-0)
2. Minneapolis North (5-0)
3. Barnesville (5-0)
4. Redwood Valley (5-0)
5. Maple River (5-0)
6. St. Charles (5-0)
7. Hawley (4-1)
8. Royalton (5-0)
9. Paynesville (4-1)
10. Pipestone Area (4-1)



Class 3A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:55:53 PM

From the Associated Press.

CLASS 3A
1. Pierz (5-0)
2. Rochester Lourdes (5-0)
3. Jordan (5-0)
4. Jackson County Central (5-0)
5. Mora (5-0)
6. Spectrum (5-0)
7. St. Peter (5-0)
8. New London-Spicer (4-1)
9. Breck (4-1)
10. Annandale (4-1)



Class 4A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:55:30 PM

From the Associated Press.

CLASS 4A
1. Academy of Holy Angels (5-0)
2. Winona (5-0)
3. Hutchinson (5-0)
4. Detroit Lakes (5-0)
5. St. Paul Academy/Minnehaha Academy/Blake (5-0)
6. Marshall (5-0)
7. Dassel-Cokato (5-0)
8. Hermantown (5-0)
9. Providence Academy (5-0)
10. Cloquet (4-1)



Class 5A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:55:08 PM

From the Associated Press.

CLASS 5A
1. Owatonna (5-0)
2. Elk River (5-0)
3. St. Thomas Academy (5-0)
4. Robbinsdale Cooper (5-0)
5. Waconia (5-0)
6. St. Cloud Tech (5-0)
7. Chanhassen (4-1)
8. Mahtomedi (4-1)
9. Mankato West (4-1)
10. Bemidji (4-1)



Class 6A Football Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:54:46 PM

From the Associated Press.

CLASS 6A
1. Lakeville North (5-0)
2. Blaine (5-0)
3. Eden Prairie (4-1)
4. Minnetonka (4-1)
5. East Ridge (4-1)
6. Woodbury (4-1)
7. Edina (4-1)
8. St. Michael-Albertville (3-2)
9. Prior Lake (3-2)
10. White Bear Lake (4-1)



Class 2A Girls Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:54:06 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Eagan
2 Wayzata
3 Edina
4 Stillwater
5 Andover
6 Eden Prairie
7 Maple Grove
8 East Ridge
9 Minnetonka
10 Anoka
Others Centennial, White Bear Lake, Blaine, Lakeville N, Woodbury, Rosemount




Class 2A Boys Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:53:39 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Minneapolis Washburn
2 Stillwater
3 Duluth East
4 Minnetonka
5 St Louis Park
6 St Paul Central
7 East Ridge
8 Prior Lake
9 Centennial
10 Maple Grove
Others Champlin Park



Class 1A Girls Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:53:02 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Visitation
2 Hill-Murray
3 Waconia
4 Mahtomedi
5 Holy Angels
6 Orono
7 Blake
8 Monticello
9 Benilde-St. Margaret’s
10 Cloquet-Carlton
Others Mankato West, De LaSalle, Chisago Lakes, Rochester Lourdes, Bemidji




Class 1A Boys Soccer Rankings
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 10/3/2018 5:52:18 PM

From the Minnesota State High School Soccer Coaches Association.

1 Totino-Grace
2 Breck
3 Holy Angels
4 Blake
5 Austin
6 Mahtomedi
7 Bemidji
8 Worthington
9 Holy Family
10 Rochester Lourdes
Others DeLaSalle, St. Paul Washington, St Cloud Apollo



View Posts by Month:  
December, 2018 (15)  
November, 2018 (30)  
October, 2018 (38)  
September, 2018 (63)  
August, 2018 (13)  
July, 2018 (14)  
June, 2018 (14)  
May, 2018 (36)  
April, 2018 (14)  
March, 2018 (30)  
February, 2018 (48)  
January, 2018 (67)  
December, 2017 (50)  
November, 2017 (35)  
October, 2017 (45)  
September, 2017 (71)  
August, 2017 (17)  
July, 2017 (11)  
June, 2017 (22)  
May, 2017 (42)  
April, 2017 (35)  
March, 2017 (29)  
February, 2017 (38)  
January, 2017 (47)  
December, 2016 (26)  
November, 2016 (42)  
October, 2016 (49)  
September, 2016 (25)  
August, 2016 (11)  
July, 2016 (6)  
June, 2016 (15)  
May, 2016 (11)  
April, 2016 (9)  
March, 2016 (14)  
February, 2016 (18)  
January, 2016 (5)  
December, 2015 (7)  
November, 2015 (18)  
October, 2015 (11)  
September, 2015 (12)  
August, 2015 (11)  
July, 2015 (3)  
June, 2015 (12)  
May, 2015 (10)  
April, 2015 (8)  
March, 2015 (14)  
February, 2015 (16)  
January, 2015 (8)  
December, 2014 (4)  
November, 2014 (14)  
October, 2014 (8)  
September, 2014 (11)  
August, 2014 (8)  
July, 2014 (5)  
June, 2014 (12)  
May, 2014 (9)  
April, 2014 (10)  
March, 2014 (17)  
February, 2014 (15)  
January, 2014 (11)  
December, 2013 (8)  
November, 2013 (27)  
October, 2013 (24)  
September, 2013 (16)  
August, 2013 (14)  
July, 2013 (5)  
June, 2013 (13)  
May, 2013 (12)  
April, 2013 (14)  
March, 2013 (25)  
February, 2013 (20)  
January, 2013 (13)  
December, 2012 (15)  
November, 2012 (31)  
October, 2012 (26)  
September, 2012 (25)  
August, 2012 (12)  
July, 2012 (3)  
June, 2012 (20)  
May, 2012 (10)  
April, 2012 (11)  
March, 2012 (39)  
February, 2012 (19)  
January, 2012 (11)  
December, 2011 (13)  
November, 2011 (29)  
October, 2011 (29)  
September, 2011 (28)  
August, 2011 (15)  
July, 2011 (3)  
June, 2011 (22)  
May, 2011 (16)  
April, 2011 (15)  
March, 2011 (42)  
February, 2011 (20)  
January, 2011 (16)  
December, 2010 (14)  
November, 2010 (47)  
October, 2010 (39)  
September, 2010 (30)  
August, 2010 (26)  
July, 2010 (8)  
June, 2010 (45)  
May, 2010 (28)  
April, 2010 (29)  
March, 2010 (88)  
 


Copyright 1994-2018 Minnesota State High School League
2100 Freeway Boulevard Brooklyn Center, MN 55430-1735    |    (763) 560-2262     |     FAX (763) 569-0499