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Remembering MSHSL Official Jim Mylander
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 7/29/2015 1:33:19 PM

Jim Mylander, who was a longtime official in baseball, football and basketball, died Tuesday from complications related to liver cancer. Jim lived in Bloomington with his wife Natalie and daughter Emily.

On Jim's CaringBridge website, this message was posted Monday:

Well we got home from Jim's family reunion in Chicago. We had a terrific time...Cubs game, picnic, and seeing everyone. Jim was in his glory! But as of last night, he took a real decline for the worst. So Emily and I checked him into the hospice home at 7019 Lynmar Lane in Edina this morning. It won't be long now before Jim reaches his goal of seeing his Savior. God is so good! We love you all and will stay in touch! Natalie and Emily

This was posted Wednesday morning:

Yesterday at 4 PM our Savior Jesus took Jim home to heaven. Emily and I had our chance to say our goodbyes and that we would see him in heaven. He died so peacefully after being in so much pain through the night. God's plan of the whole family reunion, getting us home safely and dying at hospice was so beautiful! He fought the good fight so courageously. One of his favorite bible verses was Proverbs 17:17 "A friend loves at all times..." And he lived it faithfully. Funeral arrangements are still pending but at this time the plan is Fri August 7th viewing at the funeral home and the funeral service Sat August 8th at our church Holy Emmanuel. I will keep you all updated! We love you all! We know Jim is at peace visiting with everybody in heaven. In Christ's name, Natalie and Emily

Everyone associated with the MSHSL, especially our family of officials, expresses our sympathy to Jim's family and friends.

I wrote about Jim on October 21, 2013. Here is that story:

A Veteran Official Can’t Wait To Get Back In The Game

Jim Mylander can’t wait to get back to officiating high school football, basketball and baseball games. His 15-year MSHSL officiating career has been put on hold while he deals with cancer, but he will be back.

The Bloomington resident, who graduated from high school in Ellsworth, Wis., in 1979, was diagnosed with liver cancer in the spring of 2012. After mysteriously losing nearly 30 pounds and feeling fatigued, tests revealed that his hemoglobin was low and he was losing blood. Cancer was discovered in his colon, which had moved to his liver in the form of four tumors. By this past July he had undergone 27 rounds of chemotherapy.

He hasn’t suffered from many serious side effects with the chemo, and he has been able to officiate some youth sporting events. While not officiating high school games, he often watches games from the sidelines and spends time with his officiating buddies before and after games, as well as at halftime.

“I have a ton of friends who do multiple sports,” he said. “They always let me join them at halftime. They ask me about what I saw and how they were doing.”

Mylander, who works as an inventory controls specialist at United Bankers' Bank in Bloomington, was a three-sport athlete in high school and became an official as a way to remain involved in athletics. He began working youth football games in 1991 and has been an MSHSL official since 1999.

“I wanted the continuation of high school sports, and above all the kids keep me young,” he said. “I enjoy it.”

Surgery to remove part of his liver was originally scheduled for early September, but doctors discovered that tumors were dangerously close to vital blood vessels. So instead of surgery he has undergone one round of radioactive embolization, a process in which a catheter is used to inject small radioactive beads into the arteries near the tumors. That procedure will be repeated in early November. If all goes well the tumors will be gone and he will be given a clean bill of health.

Jim and his family – wife Natalie and daughter Emily – have been posting regular updates on his CaringBridge website. The most recent update said …

Good Morning to all...
Jim had his first radiation treatment yesterday. We were at the hospital a good part of the day, but all went well. Praise God!! He is home resting today. His next treatment will be the beginning of November. Then we leave it all in God's hands. We pray this works to reduce or get rid of the tumors. Thanks to all of you for your love, prayers and support. We cannot tell you how much this means to Jim, Em and myself. Jim's dads favorite line was "GOD IS GOOD" and we are certainly experiencing this through our difficult journey.
God Bless you all,
The Mylanders

When Jim and I talked, he said, “I have been blessed because the main effect has been being overly tired sometimes. I never had any nausea; only a couple reactions to chemo last August put me in the hospital for two nights. I have had so much support from officiating colleagues, CaringBridge, Facebook and all the MSHSL people.”

Both of Jim’s parents died of cancer in the 1990s. When I asked him if his own experience with cancer had changed him, he said. “It’s given me a new perspective on taking care of myself better and not taking each day for granted. Because you can never know what can happen.

“I miss being out on the field, because I enjoy it. It keeps me young.”



Flashback: The Jarvis Johnson Story
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 7/12/2015 8:50:37 PM

ESPN's SportsCenter broadcasts on Sunday included a lengthy feature story about Jarvis Johnson, who was part of four Class 3A boys basketball state championship teams at DeLaSalle. When he was in eighth grade, Jarvis collapsed at basketball practice and was in fact not alive for several minutes. You can find the TV story by going to ESPN.go.com and clicking on the men's college basketball page.

I wrote about Jarvis back in December, and this seems like a good time to resurrect that story. Here it is ...


Jarvis Johnson, a senior at DeLaSalle, is a well-known name in the boys basketball world. He hopes to lead the Islanders to a fourth consecutive Class 3A state championship this season before continuing his career at the University of Minnesota.

That’s pretty good for a kid who died four years ago.

It was December 2010. He collapsed at basketball practice as an eighth-grader and was clinically dead for between seven and 12 minutes. The story of how he came back to life is amazing, and the fact that he is one of the top athletes in Minnesota – with a surgically inserted defibrilattor keeping watch on his heart -- adds another incredible layer to the story of a young man who is a walking miracle.

I visited Jarvis during his lunch break at school, and he told me the story of what he said was just a regular day…

“I went to practice, stretched out a little bit, I was getting loose going up and down the court and I just collapsed,” he said. He began foaming from the mouth. There was no pulse. Doctors later confirmed it was a heart attack; what 14-year-old kid gets taken down by a heart attack?

Calls were made to 911 and Jarvis’ parents. When his father arrived, paramedics were working on Jarvis but they were not optimistic. Just recently, Jarvis’ dad told his son what took place.

“The ambulance people were saying, ‘Sir, he’s been dead for so long he’s not going to make it,’ ” Jarvis said. “My dad told them he wanted to speak with me for one more minute, and he started talking to me. Then they said I had a pulse. They asked him to keep talking to me.”

Johnson was transported to North Memorial Medical Center, where he was placed into a medically induced coma. He regained consciousness four or five days later and remained hospitalized for two weeks.

“The process was tough,” he said. “That doesn’t happen very often to a 14-year-old.”

No kidding.

The fact that Johnson is a top basketball player is just part of his story today. DeLaSalle coach Dave Thorson said Jarvis has become a team leader as well as an inspiration to those who around him.

“What I appreciate most about Jarvis is his attitude and his love of the game,” Thorson said. “I also have a lot of respect for the maturing that’s happened. He’s really been a leader for us in terms of his effort, not only in basketball but in all the other areas that go into being a student-athlete. I can’t tell you proud I am of him and how proud I am of the development that’s taken place.

“He is coming into that role of being a senior leader in a way that I’m just thrilled about. Whether it’s how he communicates in practice, what sort of role modeling he does as a student, how he carries himself. It means something to be an Islander, and he understands that.”

Johnson’s final list of colleges was Minnesota, Wisconsin, Baylor, Nevada-Las Vegas and Wichita State. He said the decision to become a Gopher was an easy one after he made his official visit to the campus that’s only about two miles from DeLaSalle.

“I got a chance to interact with some of the players, went to a class. As soon as I left I felt that the was place for me to be. Just getting to know coach (Richard) Pitino since he’s been here, that’s been excellent. He’s been totally honest throughout the whole recruitment.”

Thorson and the college coaches who recruited Johnson are well aware of his heart history. Jarvis knows that if he feels tired he needs to take himself out of the game; but that hasn’t happened much in recent years.

He also was recruited by Iowa State. The NBA career of Cyclones coach Fred Hoiberg was ended by a heart ailment, and Hoiberg has a pacemaker implanted in his chest.

“He and I did have conversations about it,” Johnson said. “It was kind of an interesting topic between me and coach Hoiberg.”

In the immediate aftermath of Johnson’s heart attack, doctors told him he would probably never play basketball again. That was crushing.

“That was probably the most devastating news a kid can hear at 14 years old,” he said. “After that we prayed, I took things slowly, and a few months later we went back for another checkup. The doctor asked me if I really wanted to play again. He said I could play but be cautious, take my time and ask to come out when I felt tired. By the end of the year I almost felt back to being myself.”

Before Johnson was cleared by his doctors, one of them suggested that he take up golf or ping-pong. That didn’t sit too well.

“I was pretty upset after that,” he said, smiling. “I’m not good at either one.”

The 6-foot-1 guard is quick, strong and athletic. He has helped the Islanders win those three state titles and they are ranked No. 1 in Class 3A this season. DeLaSalle has produced a long list of college players; Reid Travis graduated last spring and is now in the starting lineup at Stanford. Johnson is the next in that storied line from the Catholic school that sits on Nicollet Island in the middle of the Mississippi River in downtown Minneapolis.

“Jarvis is one of those high school athletes who younger kids look to,” Thorson said. “With all the notoriety that happens now with recruiting, and with his decisions, some of that you don’ really ask for, you get it whether you want it or not. But Jarvis does a marvelous job of that, in terms of interacting with those young people.”

Johnson doesn’t mind talking about his health history and doesn’t shy away from questions. He doesn’t think about it all the time, but when he’s falling asleep he sometimes feels the defibrillator.

“I really don’t notice it much, it’s the kind of thing you kind of forget about,” he said. “The only time I really can feel it is sometimes when I’m going to sleep, when everything’s quiet.

“I think about it a lot of times when I’m going to sleep. It’s just like, ‘What if I didn’t have a heart attack, would I be the same person I am today?’ I think about that pretty often.

“I think it would be different. It would definitely be different.”



From Minnesota To Rwanda: The Drive Behind ‘All Day Fore Africa’
Posted by John Millea (jmillea@mshsl.org) - Updated 7/6/2015 1:50:33 PM

An important event will take place in Worthington on Monday, July 13. The sixth annual All Day Fore Africa golf outing will blend golf, fun and fundraising in an effort to assist people in Rwanda.

All Day Fore Africa is the brainchild of Kate Lesnar, who founded the program several years ago when she was in high school; Kate is now in college. I first wrote about All Day Fore Africa in June 2012, when Kate was a junior in high school and playing in the state golf tournament.

As the below story states, you can learn about All Day Fore Africa by clicking on a Facebook page under that name or Googling "All Day Fore Africa."

Here's my story from 2012...

As Kate Lesnar plays in the Class 2A state golf tournament Tuesday and Wednesday at the Ridges at Sand Creek course near Jordan, she will surely concentrate on each shot but her mind may wander ever so slightly. The student at Worthington High School, who will be a senior in the fall, can be forgiven if her thoughts turn to children and families who live 8,000 miles away but know they can count on their friend Kate.

Kate is passionate about golf and talented at the game, also qualifying for the state tournament a year ago. Her other passion is the village of Kibeho in the African nation of Rwanda and the children who attend St. Stanislaus School there. One week after the state tournament ends, Kate will wake up very early to head for Worthington Country Club and a day of fundraising for the children in Rwanda.

It’s quite the connection; a teenage girl from Minnesota and a small village in Rwanda. It began because Kate’s mother, Kathy Lesnar, works as a personal manager for Immaculee Ilibagiza, a survivor of genocide in Rwanda during the 1990s who has become a best-selling author and one of the world's leading speakers on peace, faith and forgiveness.

As Kate learned about Immaculee’s background and her mission to aid people in Rwanda, the idea seemed so natural: Raise money by playing 100 holes of golf in a single day, taking pledges from anyone who wanted to contribute. The first event, in 2010, raised more than $10,000, which paid for a new water system for St. Stanislaus School as well as clothing, shoes and similar items.

“My goal was $1,000,” Kate said. “We thought that was really high but we thought we could get close to it. Every single day we’d get checks in the mail; from a person in Georgia and just random people. It was a miracle how it all came together.”

This year’s event will be held June 20 at Worthington Country Club. The non-profit project is called “All Day Fore Africa” (you can find a website under that name as well as a Facebook page). The project is subtitled “Kids Playing For Kids” because much of the work is done by teens and younger children. An example: Kate’s younger sister Annie and her friend Kailey Wendland will help raise money by performing with their guitars at BenLee's Cafe in downtown Worthington on June 19, with BenLee's donating a portion of each lunch sold to the cause. More than a dozen people have signed up to play 100 holes in Worthington the next day, so the project is growing.

“Lots of people say, ‘This is such a good idea: Kids using their passion to make a difference.’ It’s a super idea,” Kate said. “It’s going to be as big as God wants it to be.”

After all that money was raised in 2010, Kate, Kathy, Immaculee and several others traveled to Kibeho to visit and present the funds to Father Leszek Czelusniak, the Polish-born priest at St. Stanislaus. Last year’s effort spread to similar events in California, Pennsylvania and Nebraska and raised more than $30,000. Each event is followed by a trip to Kibeho.

Kate will never forget her first journey to the village.

“I was so overwhelmed. They have to walk a mile up a hill to the school. Right when we could see the school, the kids saw us and sprinted out to us. It was so cool seeing how happy they were. They were barefoot, in ripped t-shirts. … They realized that something good had happened. They were all so happy.”

Immaculee Ilibagiza and Father Celusniak will attend next week’s event in Worthington. The Lesnars are hoping that more people around the country learn about All Day Fore Africa and plan their own events.

“I feel like it’s starting,” said Kathy. “Some people may want to go bowling all day for Africa or play soccer. For me as a parent it’s so awesome to see the kids realize they can make a difference in the world. As far as building character, we push our kids to be the best they can be. This organization is focused more on shaping kids’ hearts, and the benefit is as much for the kids in the U.S. It’s planting seeds of love in people’s hearts.”

The money raised this year will go toward teachers and a much-needed medical facility. “When someone’s sick they put them on a stretcher and walk them to the nearest place,” Kate said.

Kathy said, “The medical facility is a big one. We’re talking bigger money, and we can do it.”
The Lesnars will have materials about All Day Fore Africa with them at the state tournament this week, and they will accept donations from anyone who wishes to help. They are happy to spearhead the project, but they know they are not alone.

“It seems like a story about Kate,” Kathy said. “But it’s really a story about a bunch of kids.”

To which Kate added, “And without the community support it never would have grown like this.”



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