Heads Up: Concussion in High School Sports

A FACT SHEET FOR PARENTS

What is a concussion?
A concussion is a brain injury. Concussions are caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. They can range from mild to severe and can disrupt the way the brain normally works. Even a ďdingĒ or a bump on the head can be serious.

What are the signs and symptoms?
You canít see a concussion. Signs and symptoms of concussion can show up right after the injury or can take days or weeks to appear. If your teen reports any symptoms of concussion, or if you notice the symptoms yourself, seek medical attention right away.

Signs Observed by Parents or Guardians

Symptoms Reported by Athlete

What should you do if you think your teenage athlete has a concussion?

  1. Seek medical attention right away. A health care professional will be able to decide how serious the concussion is and when it is safe for your teen to return to sports.   
  1. Keep your teen out of play. Concussions take time to heal. Donít let your teen return to play until a health care professional says itís OK. Athletes who return to play too soonówhile the brain is still healingórisk a greater chance of having a second concussion. Second or later concussions can be very serious. They can cause permanent brain damage, affecting your teen for a lifetime.      
  1. Tell all of your teenís coaches about any recent concussion. Coaches should know if your teen had a recent concussion in ANY sport. Your teenís coaches may not know about a concussion your teen received in another sport or activity unless you tell them. Knowing about the concussion will allow the coach to keep your teen from activities that could result in another concussion.
  1. Remind your teen: Itís better to miss one game than the whole season. 

 Itís better to miss one game than the whole season.  

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CENTERS
FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION
February 2005

TeamUp     ó     Series 2     ó     2006     ó    MSHSL